Independent Living Expo.

Snipped

On the 8th Jessica and me went along to Olympic Park for the biennial Independent Living Exposition. Being held there and a journey fraught with stress for Jessica we hired our regular Accessible Cabbie and had a fairly nice journey both there and back.

Featuring

https://www.atsaindependentlivingexpo.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/ATSA-SYD-16pp-program-LR-100419.pdf

There are many different types of wheelchairs depending upon the level of disability or desired use for the chair. There was everything from walkers and toddlers wheelchairs, through to 4 wheel independent suspension+4 motors for Farmers. We had stair climbers and standing chairs for golf, one shaped like a peddle car foe a child. Tricycles, Racing Bikes. Off road vehicles. Finally, very expensive vehicles adapted for wheelchair drivers.

In the first photograph Jessica is trying the controls of a vehicle, earlier she had dropped her age by 15 years and crossed gender again to trial the 4 wheel drive independent suspension demonstration track. Then when she let on that she was female they also had to allow women to trial the trail.

The display I found the most humorous was that of the skeleton demonstrating passive exercise, there are two photos of it in the gallery, one for arm and the other for legs. And a few stuffed bears and a doll found their way into the action.

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Pituitary Tumour saying hello

Life in between

Since our Pituitary tumour appeared to have been tamed in 2003, I say our since to a great degree it has governed our lives since we first met in 1998.

Jessica’s Stroke in January 2013 saw the return of enough eyesight to begin Woodturning,again, after many years. The stroke wiggled itself into our lives under the guise of a disturbance in her vision. We had made her way into the Hospital in Randwick to see the Eye registra only to have the diagnosis STROKE. It was in the Right Visul Cortex and so caused no physical disturbance other than almost 20 20 vision in that part of the eye that could see anything at all.

October of 2017 we were visited by a little visitor by the name of Heart Attack. With S.C.A.D which we will mention later.

Presently

Which should come first? Since our Heart Attack Jessica’s sight has returned to less than it was before and we now have a date for a Corneal transplant on April 18th.

Now

Las week we had another M.R.I., called for by the Eye Specialist who will be doing the surgery. Just in the case that the Tumour was active again and was responsible for the recent reoccurence in our loss of vision.

We called our usual wheelchair cabbie and set off early to SVHospel in Darlinghurst where recurring M.R.I.s are free. Taking the DVD home with us we popped it into the computer to puzzle it out. From what we can see the Tumour may be slightly larger, though not large enough to reflect major sympotoms such as lactating or high Pregosterone levels. We shall not know for sure until we see the Specialist.

M.R.I. Machine

Dr. Raymond Damadian, a physician and scientist, toiled for years trying to produce a machine that could noninvasively scan the body with the use of magnets. Along with some graduate students, he constructed a superconducting magnet and fashioned a coil of antenna wires. Since no one wanted to be the first one in this contraption, Damadian volunteered to be the first patientDr. Raymond Damadian, a physician and scientist, toiled for years trying to produce a machine that could noninvasively scan the body with the use of magnets. Along with some graduate students, he constructed a superconducting magnet and fashioned a coil of antenna wires. Since no one wanted to be the first one in this contraption, Damadian volunteered to be the first patient…[…]

https://science.howstuffworks.com/mri.htm

Journaling to Sanity

something I must begin again.
1960 TRIP ABROAD–In the spring of 1960,

AS OF CHRISTMAS DAY 2018 the following is being added near the beginning of this page so any readers won’t have to spend so much time rolling down to the end, where I think most additions are supposed to be posted:  1960 TRIP ABROAD–In the spring of 1960, less than a year after we married, we both caught the      hepatitis that was going around the UF campus. The doctors recommended rest, and that was the impetus for the European trip that had only been fantasized….[ ]

Visit http://www.gerrystarnes.com/journal/ and see what you think.

Two Types of Dreamers — Lonely Blue Boy

There are two types of dreamers: the first is very sensitive but creative and the second is very secretive but adaptive, and I think I am capable of being both.

via Two Types of Dreamers — Lonely Blue Boy

Andrews having weird seizures

Epilepsy In-Depth Report

Background

Epilepsy is a brain disorder involving repeated, spontaneous seizures of any type. Epilepsy is not a single disorder but rather a wide spectrum of problems. What all types of epilepsy share are recurrent, unprovoked seizures caused by an uncontrolled electrical discharge from nerve cells in the cerebral cortex. This part of the brain controls higher mental functions, general movement, and the functions of the internal organs in the abdominal cavity, perception, and behavioral reactions.

The structures of the brain include the brainstem, consisting of the spinal cord, the medulla oblongata, the pons and the midbrain; the cerebellum; the cerebrum (one half, or hemisphere shown); and the diencephalon.

SEIZURES

Seizures are a symptom of epilepsy. Seizures (“fits,” convulsions) are episodes of disturbed brain function that cause changes in attention or behavior. They are caused by abnormally excited electrical signals in the brain.

A single seizure may be related to a temporary medical problem (such as brain or tumor withdrawal from alcohol). If repeated seizures do not happen again once this underlying problem is corrected, the person does not have epilepsy.

A single, first seizure that cannot be explained by a temporary medical problem has about a 25% chance of returning. After a second seizure occurs, there is about a 70% chance of future seizures and the diagnosis of epilepsy.

TYPES OF EPILEPSY

Epilepsy is generally classified into two main categories based on seizure type:

  • Partial (also called focal or localized) seizures. These seizures are more common than generalized seizures and occur in one or more specific locations in the brain. In some cases, partial seizures can spread to wide regions of the brain. They are likely to develop from specific injuries, but in most cases the exact origins are unknown ( idiopathic ).
  • Generalized seizures. These seizures typically occur in both sides of the brain. Many forms of these seizures are genetically based. There is usually normal neurologic function.

PARTIAL SEIZURES (ALSO CALLED FOCAL SEIZURES)

These seizures are subcategorized as “simple” or “complex partial.”

  • Simple Partial Seizures. A person with a simple partial seizure (sometimes known as Jacksonian epilepsy) does not lose consciousness, but may experience confusion, jerking movements, tingling, or odd mental and emotional events. Such events may include deja vu, mild hallucinations, or extreme responses to smell and taste. After the seizure, the patient usually has temporary weakness in certain muscles. These seizures typically last about 90 seconds.
  • Complex Partial Seizures. Slightly over half of seizures in adults are complex partial type. About 80% of these seizures originate in the temporal lobe, the part of the brain located close to the ear. Disturbances there can result in loss of judgment, involuntary or uncontrolled behavior, or even loss of consciousness. Patients may lose consciousness briefly and appear to others as motionless with a vacant stare. Emotions can be exaggerated; some patients even appear to be drunk. After a few seconds, a patient may begin to perform repetitive movements, such as chewing or smacking of lips. Episodes usually last no more than 2 minutes. They may occur infrequently, or as often as every day. A throbbing headache may follow a complex partial seizure.

In some cases, simple or complex partial seizures evolve into what are known as secondarily generalized seizures. The progress may be so rapid that the partial stage is not even noticed.

GENERALIZED SEIZURES

Generalized seizures are caused by nerve cell disturbances that occur in more widespread areas of the brain than do partial seizures. Therefore, they have a more serious effect on the patient. They are further subcategorized as tonic-clonic (or grand mal), absence (petit mal), myoclonic, or atonic seizures.

Tonic-Clonic (Grand Mal) Seizures. The first stage of a grand mal seizure is called the tonic phase, in which the muscles suddenly contract, causing the patient to fall and lie stiffly for about 10 – 30 seconds. Some people experience a premonition or aura before a grand mal seizure. Most, however, lose consciousness without warning. If the throat or larynx is affected, there may be a high-pitched musical sound (stridor) when the patient inhales. Spasms occur for about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Then the seizure enters the second phase, called the clonic phase. The muscles begin to alternate between relaxation and rigidity. After this phase, the patient may lose bowel or urinary control. The seizure usually lasts a total of 2 – 3 minutes, after which the patient remains unconscious for a while and then awakens to confusion and extreme fatigue. A severe throbbing headache similar to migraine may also follow the tonic-clonic phases.

Absence (Petit Mal) Seizures. Absence or petit mal seizures are brief losses of consciousness that occur for 3 – 30 seconds. Physical movement and loss of attention may stop for only a moment. Such seizures may pass unnoticed by others. Young children may simply appear to be staring or walking distractedly. Petit mal may be confused with simple or complex partial seizures, or even with attention deficit disorder. In petit mal, however, a person may experience attacks as often as 50 – 100 times a day.

Myoclonic. Myoclonic seizures are a series of brief jerky contractions of specific muscle groups, such as the face or trunk……

Read more at Epilepsy In-Depth Report – New York Times

Epilepsy – In-Depth Report – NY Times Health. 2017. Epilepsy – In-Depth Report – NY Times Health. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/epilepsy/print.html. [Accessed 07 October 2017].

Venetian Gardens – Dinata Misovec

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We drove to the house mid morning, but no one was there. We walked around a bit anyway and then stopped by the grocery store for some fruit before heading back to the motorhome for lunch. Since the…[ more photos and article through here]

Source: Venetian Gardens – Dinata Misovec