Andrews having weird seizures

Epilepsy In-Depth Report

Background

Epilepsy is a brain disorder involving repeated, spontaneous seizures of any type. Epilepsy is not a single disorder but rather a wide spectrum of problems. What all types of epilepsy share are recurrent, unprovoked seizures caused by an uncontrolled electrical discharge from nerve cells in the cerebral cortex. This part of the brain controls higher mental functions, general movement, and the functions of the internal organs in the abdominal cavity, perception, and behavioral reactions.

The structures of the brain include the brainstem, consisting of the spinal cord, the medulla oblongata, the pons and the midbrain; the cerebellum; the cerebrum (one half, or hemisphere shown); and the diencephalon.

SEIZURES

Seizures are a symptom of epilepsy. Seizures (“fits,” convulsions) are episodes of disturbed brain function that cause changes in attention or behavior. They are caused by abnormally excited electrical signals in the brain.

A single seizure may be related to a temporary medical problem (such as brain or tumor withdrawal from alcohol). If repeated seizures do not happen again once this underlying problem is corrected, the person does not have epilepsy.

A single, first seizure that cannot be explained by a temporary medical problem has about a 25% chance of returning. After a second seizure occurs, there is about a 70% chance of future seizures and the diagnosis of epilepsy.

TYPES OF EPILEPSY

Epilepsy is generally classified into two main categories based on seizure type:

  • Partial (also called focal or localized) seizures. These seizures are more common than generalized seizures and occur in one or more specific locations in the brain. In some cases, partial seizures can spread to wide regions of the brain. They are likely to develop from specific injuries, but in most cases the exact origins are unknown ( idiopathic ).
  • Generalized seizures. These seizures typically occur in both sides of the brain. Many forms of these seizures are genetically based. There is usually normal neurologic function.

PARTIAL SEIZURES (ALSO CALLED FOCAL SEIZURES)

These seizures are subcategorized as “simple” or “complex partial.”

  • Simple Partial Seizures. A person with a simple partial seizure (sometimes known as Jacksonian epilepsy) does not lose consciousness, but may experience confusion, jerking movements, tingling, or odd mental and emotional events. Such events may include deja vu, mild hallucinations, or extreme responses to smell and taste. After the seizure, the patient usually has temporary weakness in certain muscles. These seizures typically last about 90 seconds.
  • Complex Partial Seizures. Slightly over half of seizures in adults are complex partial type. About 80% of these seizures originate in the temporal lobe, the part of the brain located close to the ear. Disturbances there can result in loss of judgment, involuntary or uncontrolled behavior, or even loss of consciousness. Patients may lose consciousness briefly and appear to others as motionless with a vacant stare. Emotions can be exaggerated; some patients even appear to be drunk. After a few seconds, a patient may begin to perform repetitive movements, such as chewing or smacking of lips. Episodes usually last no more than 2 minutes. They may occur infrequently, or as often as every day. A throbbing headache may follow a complex partial seizure.

In some cases, simple or complex partial seizures evolve into what are known as secondarily generalized seizures. The progress may be so rapid that the partial stage is not even noticed.

GENERALIZED SEIZURES

Generalized seizures are caused by nerve cell disturbances that occur in more widespread areas of the brain than do partial seizures. Therefore, they have a more serious effect on the patient. They are further subcategorized as tonic-clonic (or grand mal), absence (petit mal), myoclonic, or atonic seizures.

Tonic-Clonic (Grand Mal) Seizures. The first stage of a grand mal seizure is called the tonic phase, in which the muscles suddenly contract, causing the patient to fall and lie stiffly for about 10 – 30 seconds. Some people experience a premonition or aura before a grand mal seizure. Most, however, lose consciousness without warning. If the throat or larynx is affected, there may be a high-pitched musical sound (stridor) when the patient inhales. Spasms occur for about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Then the seizure enters the second phase, called the clonic phase. The muscles begin to alternate between relaxation and rigidity. After this phase, the patient may lose bowel or urinary control. The seizure usually lasts a total of 2 – 3 minutes, after which the patient remains unconscious for a while and then awakens to confusion and extreme fatigue. A severe throbbing headache similar to migraine may also follow the tonic-clonic phases.

Absence (Petit Mal) Seizures. Absence or petit mal seizures are brief losses of consciousness that occur for 3 – 30 seconds. Physical movement and loss of attention may stop for only a moment. Such seizures may pass unnoticed by others. Young children may simply appear to be staring or walking distractedly. Petit mal may be confused with simple or complex partial seizures, or even with attention deficit disorder. In petit mal, however, a person may experience attacks as often as 50 – 100 times a day.

Myoclonic. Myoclonic seizures are a series of brief jerky contractions of specific muscle groups, such as the face or trunk……

Read more at Epilepsy In-Depth Report – New York Times

Epilepsy – In-Depth Report – NY Times Health. 2017. Epilepsy – In-Depth Report – NY Times Health. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/epilepsy/print.html. [Accessed 07 October 2017].

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Venetian Gardens – Dinata Misovec

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We drove to the house mid morning, but no one was there. We walked around a bit anyway and then stopped by the grocery store for some fruit before heading back to the motorhome for lunch. Since the…[ more photos and article through here]

Source: Venetian Gardens – Dinata Misovec

S.C.A.D. 18 June 2017

Mayo Clinic Coronary Conditions

SCAD not just a heart attack

Mayo Clinic SCAD

The above links are just some of those you will find if you would like to know a little more about SCAD.

On the 7th June, Jessica had gone into St. Vincent’s hospital  for the routine pre-admission, before her Total hip replacement the following Wednesday, I had gone to the dental hospital to have some new dentures fitted, intending to go to the hospital afterwards.

Things were not to be as routine as they usually are, throughout the proceedings it was discovered that unbeknown to either of us Jessica had recently had two small heart attacks.

Jessica has Autonomic Dysreflexia and does not experience pain in the same way as I do which is why the slight pains in her chest and left arm were thought nothing of because they seemed such tiny pains.

An EEG, Cardiac ultrasound, CT Angiography later confirmed that a serious event had taken place. For those who know Jessica as soon as she dressed herself after the CT Angiography she shot through even though the Cardiac Specialist had wanted to admit her.

Well, we received a telephone call that evening from a Dr Andrew Jabbour telling madame that she had a very serious condition for which he was arranging an Angiogram the next morning. During the procedure Jessica suffered an incidence of  of Bradycardia which truncated the proceedings though enough information was gathered to make a diagnosis.

They called “code blue” and admitted her and when I arrived she was as chirpy as ever after her latest adventure.

Apparently her event of Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection had been totally asymptomatic since it cannot quite be determined when it happened and Jessica recalls no symptoms-

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) are the same as symptoms of other types of heart attacks and may include:

  • Chest pain
  • A rapid heartbeat or fluttery feeling in your chest
  • Pain in your arms, shoulders or jaw
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating
  • Unusual, extreme tiredness
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness

And I noticed none.

For all anyone seems to guess, for very little information came our way from her medical team, it may have happened a few years ago down to a few hours ago.

Published on Jan 13, 2015

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is the leading cause of heart attack in women under age 40 and until recently was largely unstudied due to the erroneous belief that it was a rare occurrence. Novel patient-initiated research initiated in 2010 by the multidisciplinary Mayo Clinic SCAD Research Program SCAD is changing that. Mayo Clinic is the leading clinical and research program for SCAD, a cause of heart attack

 

Published on Aug 29, 2011

Don’t worry — you’re just tired and out of sorts after having your baby. But the chest pain experienced by the woman you’re about to meet was much more than a difficult recovery. She had a heart attack when a rare and deadly condition stopped blood flow to her heart. The same thing happened to another woman. After sharing their stories on social networking sites they found more women with the same problem. That’s when they

Published on Feb 21, 2013

A heart attack at age 35. That’s not supposed to happen. The woman you’re about to meet suffered what’s called a spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD. It’s a condition that’s hard to diagnose and there’s very little information available about it. Experts at Mayo Clinic have results from studies aimed at learning more about this life-threatening condition.


Jessica’s hip Replacement was cancelled and now she is getting to know the world of SCAD survivors with many appointments to various clinics.

Andrew

A Mother’s Day – Art by Rob Goldstein

 

Holly says she doesn’t care about Jeremy’s lifestyle but she doesn’t understand is why he’s proud of it. Jeremy is her favorite son: a tall blond man who looks old enough to be he…[ continued]

Source: A Mother’s Day – Art by Rob Goldstein

March | 2017 | Two Rooms Plus Utilities

cropped-cropped-541661_368176703253496_1179281093_n1It just keeps coming
Posted in chronic illness, Chronic pain, Fibromyalgia, Life, Multiple Sclerosis

When you live with a body that never gets things right, well, eventually, nothing ever surprises you. Doing something incorrectly is as second nature to my body, as breathing is.

If you live in Scotland and you are aged over 50, every two years they send you out a bowel cancer test kit. All you have to do is supply a smear of your stools, from three separate dates within a ten day period, then post it back to them. It’s that simple and free, so to not do it, seems rather silly. I have to admit that I didn’t do the first one when it arrived, as it arrived on my 50th birthday, not exactly something that filled me with joy, in fact, I put it in the bin. Well, I already knew without someone rubbing it in, just how old I had become. Three weeks ago, my third test kit arrived and I once more set out to comply with their wishes. It all sounds really easy and it is, but when you have problems both with twisting your body and with your dexterity, well, it adds a new level of complexity to the whole thing. Once complete, I put it back in it’s prepaid envelope and asked Adam to post it, then set about life as always, and as always, forgetting all about it. [ ]

1 post published by livinginalimitedword during March 2017

Source: March | 2017 | Two Rooms Plus Utilities

Challenging Feminism | BeautyBeyondBones

Lately, it’s been really weird to be a woman. Not because of any fashion or makeup trends…although, I will say…I don’t quite understand the reemergence of the shoulder pad. But because of all the r…

Source: Challenging Feminism | BeautyBeyondBones

Stream of Consciousness Saturday The Accumulator – index-very good

03/09/16 – The Accumulator, part one.    on this web here

10/09/16 – The Accumulator, part two.

17/09/16 – The Accumulator, part three.

24/09/16 – The Accumulator, part four.

01/10/16 – The Accumulator, part five.

08/10/16 – The Accumulator, part six.

15/10/16 – The Accumulator, part seven.

22/10/16 – The Accumulator, part eight.

29/10/16 – The Accumulator, part nine.

12/11/16 – The Accumulator, part ten.

19/11/16 – The Accumulator, part eleven.

26/11/16 – The Accumulator, part twelve.

03/12/16 – The Accumulator, part thirteen.

10/12/16 – The Accumulator, part fourteen.

17/12/16 – The Accumulator, part fifteen.

24/12/16 – The Accumulator, part sixteen.

Source: Stream of Consciousness Saturday short stories… | Diary of an Internet Nobody.