Thought for June 21 — Cee’s Photography

Originally posted on Cee and Chris: See all my posters on Pinterest. Part of Becca’s Nurturing Thursday challenge. Hugs, Cee email: cee@cee-chris.com ? ?

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The ascent of Muhammad to heaven (mi’rāj) – Sulṭān Muḥammad,

miraj_by_sultan_muhammad
The ascent of Muhammad to heaven (mi’rāj) by Sultan Muhammad This is a featured picture on the Turkish language Wikipedia (Seçkin resimler) and is considered one of the finest images. Sultan Muhammad-between 1539 and 1543 Medium- opaque watercolor and ink on paper Dimensions 28.7 × 18.6 cm (11.2 × 7.3 in)

Sulṭān Muḥammad, (flourished 16th century, Ṣafavid Iran), one of the greatest of Persian painters and the most notable artist of the Ṣafavid school at Tabrīz.

During the period 1495–1522 Sulṭān Muḥammad was probably the leading exponent of the Turkmen school of painting current in western Iran under the White Sheep and Black Sheep Turkmens. This school was marked by dynamic verve, illogical perspectives, concealed grotesques, violent colours, and a strong tendency to see excess as a source of virtue. This Dionysiac style was well suited to the fervent temperament of Shāh Esmāʿīl I. Yet in 1522, when the aged painter Behzād of Herāt came to reside at the court with several of his disciples, Sulṭān Muḥammad began to be influenced by the balanced, harmonious, and humane school of Herāt. The result was a magnificent blend of all the best elements of Persian painting. Sulṭān Muḥammad also found the perfect patron, the young shāh Ṭahmāsp I, son of Esmāʿīl, who took paint ing lessons from him. No doubt Ṭahmāsp’s predilection for Herāt painting also influenced the work of Sulṭān Muḥammad.

During the period 1520–38 Sulṭān Muḥammad worked along with the other court artists on the great Shāh-nāmeh of Ṭahmāsp. With Shaykh-zādeh, a pupil of Behzād, he illustrated a Divān of Ḥāfiz and a Divān of the Turkish poet Mīr ʿAlī Shīr Navāʿī in 1526 and 1527. He also worked (1539–43) on the Khamseh of Neẓāmī, illustrated for Shāh Ṭahmāsp. Soon after this the Shāh turned away from painting, convinced that it was a frivolous and irreligious diversion, and though some of the Shāh’s relatives continued to act as patrons, Sulṭān Muḥammad seems to have painted no more. His son, Mīrzā ʿAlī (Muḥammadī), already a notable artist, became one of the leading painters of the next generation.

Sulṭān Muḥammad’s style was diverse, and he was considered a master by his contemporaries. In composition, colour, draftsmanship, verve, wit, and profundity he is clearly one of the greatest painters of the Islāmic world, on a par with Behzād.


Image referrences- Jon Thompson, Sheila R. Canby (eds)., Hunt for paradise, court art of Safavid Iran, 1501-1576, cat. exh. New York, Asia Society Museum, 2003-2004, Milan, Skira Editore, 2003, p. 117-118, n°4.29

Attribution: Sultan Muhammad [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Biography:  Article: Encyclopedia Britannica. 2018. Sulṭān Muḥammad | Persian painter | Britannica.com. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sultan-Muhammad. [Accessed 30 April 2018].

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I’m A Duck That Does Not Give A Quack! — Through Open Lens

F/6.3, 1/500, ISO 250. Hooded Merganser ( Female ) 2 Guys walking down the street. One walks into a bar, the other ducks. Interesting Fact: The female chooses the nest site, and may start scouting for next year’s tree cavity at the end of each breeding season. Nest cavities can be in live or dead […]

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